Mentor spotlight: Lisa Ross-Marcus

Mentor spotlight: Lisa Ross-Marcus

Lisa Ross-Marcus is an executive coach and intercultural consultant with a focus on women and leadership.

What is your story, and what led you to join the entrepreneurial world?

I moved to Paris from the United States as a student and eventually settled in Amsterdam. My first career was as a professional dancer and choreographer, creating my performances that toured throughout Europe. Later I realized that this was my first entrepreneurial experience. I was an artistic director of my foundation and raised significant money annually to fund my productions through grants, sponsoring, and income from performances. After leaving the theatre world, I established one of the first wedding planning companies in The Netherlands, ‘Dream Weddings.’ I sold the company 5 years later, after doubling the earnings every consecutive year.  In the interim, I had started to work as a corporate communication trainer for multi-national companies. The professional development field was a good fit for me, so I expanded my skills as a coach and an intercultural expert. Through my company In-Coaching, I coach and train professionals in leadership, career development, and intercultural communication.

What have you learned in your entrepreneurial career?

I have learned that taking risks is important. If you want to do something that hasn’t been done before, don’t worry about negative scenarios or what other people will think get in your way. On the contrary, there is strength in presenting new ideas and concepts because it creates curiosity.

What is one thing you still really want to do in your entrepreneurial career?

I want to explore structured ways to help develop female leaders, such as creating a self-assessment model or designing a workshop. I love experiential and creative learning; I would like to find more ways to leverage my artistic/performance background in coaching and training.

Looking back, what is one thing you would do different?

I would give more compliments and do less complaining. I have always set very high standards for myself and expected others to do the same. I have learned that acknowledging what people do well creates the trust and respect you need to address problems and get people to perform better honestly.

What is the reason you joined FEMpreneurhulp?

I jumped at the chance to be part of FEMpreneurhulp because of the mission of helping female entrepreneurs, which is in line with my focus on female leadership. I came on-board as a coach but rapidly realized that I had a lot to offer as a mentor to women relying on grants to get their enterprise off the ground. Likewise, I have a lot of experience writing successful grant proposals and having a knack for articulating compelling arguments in general, such as pitching business proposals and even winning a court case against a multi-national company. This means that when working with women through FEMpreneurhulp, I frequently switch between my ‘coaching’ and ‘mentoring’ hats. 

What are common challenges women face in the startup world, and how can we tackle them, according to you?

Speaking your mind and holding others accountable can be challenging because of a fear of not being liked or respected. Learning the skill of constructive conversations and framing that with clear intentions – why something is important for you and the company – are empowering habits to cultivate.

What would you advise women to start their journeys in the entrepreneurial space?

Keep your antenna out to connect your ambitions with opportunities. Read the local newspaper, pick up clues about valuable information in your conversations, share your ambitions with everyone. You never know when a door will open, and you need to be ready when it does. 

Mentor spotlight: Joyce Oomen-Beeris, founder of Pimcy.

Mentor spotlight: Joyce Oomen-Beeris, founder of Pimcy.

Pimcy Innovation & Portfolio management in Tilburg helps organize innovation and embed innovation in services, products, or business models. The result is an acceleration of innovation, increased innovative capability, and motivated employees. We cover the entire innovation management domain: idea management, innovation portfolio management, and life cycle management.

What is your story, and what led you to join the entrepreneurial world?
I have a career in product management and product development. After I did my master’s in Implementation & Change management, I concluded that I could not apply that knowledge in my current job. I always had a dream of starting my own business, and 5 years ago, I did.

What have you learned in your entrepreneurial career?
For the past 5 years, I have learned more than in the previous 18 years working for various companies. This is because you constantly encounter new challenges and see new things that you want to learn to provide customers with the best possible services.
I also have learned that what sometimes looks like a great idea can turn out to be something that does not work or does not make you happy. I have learned to say goodbye to things or even persons that are ‘energy drainers.’ 

What is one thing you still really want to do in your entrepreneurial career?
I want to expand further the innovation software consultation that we already offer. I think we really are distinguishing in that domain and have a great added value for the companies that hire us.

Looking back, what is one thing you would do differently in your career?
I stepped into a software opportunity as a side business. I still would have done it because I learned so much, only I would have stopped the initiative earlier on.

What would you advise women to start their journeys in the entrepreneurial space?
Women tend to do things only when they are 100% sure. My advice would be to trust your gut feeling more: if you think you can do it, you probably can. Don’t make yourself too small and humble when you are selling yourself. Women should learn to demonstrate more self-confidence.

What is the reason you joined FEMpreneurhulp?
Due to the Corona crisis, many companies have to pivot to other business models to survive. I want to contribute to that survival.

What are common challenges women face in the startup world, and how can we tackle them, according to you?
I think it has to do with my previous advice: know your worth, demonstrate self-confidence, and don’t show if you feel a bit overwhelmed.

Anything else you would like to share?
I really like FEMpreneurhulp as women are helping other women. I have often seen that women think other women are less capable than men or should not try to stand out in my career. In this way, we are our own barriers in advancing in business.

Find Joyce on www.pimcy.nl and https://www.linkedin.com/in/innovation-accelerator/